Boy bleeds to death as onlookers take video

Herman Weaver
February 2, 2017

He was neither taken to the hospital nor an ambulance was called up to help him.

Doctors said that Ali could have been saved had he been brought to the hospital in time.

In a similar incident last month, two police officers died in Mysuru, after their jeep collided head-on with a bike, following which it rammed into a state transport bus.

Videos taken at the spot show Ali, the bleeding teenager, virtually crying for help. The driver of the vehicle, Constable Lakshman, died on the spot, but Kumar's body was trapped in the mangled remains of the metallic frame.

These twin deaths, in quick succession, have reminded some of another inhuman accident nearly a year ago, in which a 24-year-old man in Bengaluru was severed in half after a truck hit the motorcycle he was driving. Soon, footage of the boy's dying moments appeared on social media.

Can India really cut its road deaths?

While it's alarming for such deaths to take place anywhere, in Karnataka the public's negligence is strikingly ironic. An ambulance arrived at the sport only half an hour later. The onlookers, according to eye-witnesses, were recording the accident on their mobile.

In May previous year, India's Supreme Court ruled that "good Samaritans" would be protected from harassment. Laws exist in Karnataka to protect citizens who help during such emergencies, yet no one volunteered to help Ali. Onlookers did not heed his appeal, reportedly fearing harassment by police and the hospital, said eyewitnesses who did not wish to be named.

Other reports by MyHealthBowl

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