Washington electors to be fined $1000 for their vote

Ray Hunter
December 24, 2016

Democrats needed to convince 37 Republican electors to go against their state-mandated votes in order for Democratic Hillary Clinton to take the White House in the Electoral College vote, but the actual number of the vote was much, much lower. Instead, three of the Washington electors threw away their votes on an apparently randomly selected Republican (however worthy Colin Powell may be), instead of coordinating with anybody else.

The last time an elector broke from the popular vote in Washington state was in 1976, when Mike Padden of Spokane Valley, who is now a Republican state senator, voted for Ronald Reagan in 1976 instead of Gerald Ford, who had won the state. Failure to do so can result in a fine as high as $1,000.

They will all be fined next week, and have 60 days to pay, according to the spokesman for Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman, who spoke to the AP. The electors will be given a chance to appeal, although the exact details of that process haven't been set/Jim Camden, SR.

Eventually, Clinton advisor John Podesta joined a call for electors to gain access to intelligence briefings about Trump's potential ties to Russian Federation before the official vote.

Only 2 Republicans successfully voted against Trump, and they were both from the deep red state of Texas.

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For example, Clinton made several trips to the critical swing state of Florida - but neglected to visit the state's panhandle. Trump fired back to his 17.6 million Twitter followers: " Bill Clinton stated that I called him after the election ".

Clinton won the state's popular vote last month, earning her 12 electoral votes.

The idea was that a bargain would be struck with GOP electors in other states to jointly divert from their pledges to elect an agreed-upon alternative candidate (presumably a moderate Republican) instead of candidate Trump.

They were not dissuaded by the threat of a fine on Monday. The group's founder, Bret Chiafalo, expressed his disagreement with Washington's decision: "I think we did what we thought was right", arguing that the rule forbidding electors from voting individually was "unconstitutional".

"Guerra and Chiafalo filed a request last week to have the fine waived, citing Alexander Hamilton's writings on the Electoral College".

Other reports by MyHealthBowl

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