Monterey Bay killer whales vs shark

Herman Weaver
December 21, 2016

The video posted on December 13 by Slater Moore Photography on Facebook has been viewed almost 500,000 times and has been shared more than 1,300 times.

On Monday off of Long Beach, private boater Eric Martin piloted a drone over a vast pod of offshore killer whales.

Slater Moore was touring California's Monterey Bay with the Monterey Bay Whale Watch (MBWW) on Tuesday, Dec. 13, when they came across two adult killer whales and two calves at sea. Moore quickly flew a drone over the scene to see what was going on.

The three killer whales were part of a larger group made up of 25 individuals who soon swarmed on the carcass. One of the two young sharks was still wriggling as the whales were tearing into their bodies.

The shark captured on the footage is estimated to be somewhere around five-feet long, although it is normal for sevengill sharks to grow as much as up to 10-feet.

The offshore killer whales only appear in Monterey Bay about every year.

The shark calves were identified as sevengill sharks, according to Taylor. They are hard to spot at sea when they feed since they typically stay at deeper waters to hunt for fish, squids and sharks. Scientists do not exactly know where these marine animals spend their time in between periods when they emerge.

A rare type of killer whale known to prey on sharks - but nearly never is seen eating them - has been documented twice this past week feasting on sharks in California.

However, she said that it's part of what makes it fun since people don't really know what's going to happen when they observe these creatures. "As their name suggests, they travel far from shore and are rarely seen", described the Center for Whale Research of the offshore orca. Needless to say, Moore and the group were shocked to see the killer whales eating a whole shark alive.

Other reports by MyHealthBowl

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